Student Stories

Monica S Moncada

Monica S Moncada

No matter when you start your experience at Cal, you always have time to find your space and have fun. I remember joining various groups and hearing about TRENZA UC Berkeley. It was so amazing how quickly and easy it has been to make friends, especially long-lasting, friendships in TRENZA where I found myself even mentoring younger members and welcoming everyone into joining our sisterhood. Never did I think I would have people looking up to me, and it is a pretty awesome feeling.

Monica S Moncada
Major: Anthropology
Freshman student

Olivia Chilcote

Olivia Chilcote

When I first arrived at UC Berkeley I wanted to connect and get involved with the Native American community on campus. I joined the American Indian Graduate Student Association (AIGSA) my first semester and have been working with this student group to help facilitate academic, social, and outreach events ever since. As the Chair of AIGSA, it has been my pleasure to work with students, staff, and faculty who have common goals of strengthening the Native American/Indigenous presence at Berkeley.

AIGSA hosts many events throughout the year, but the most important for me is our student lecture series, Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research, that brings undergraduate and graduate students together. It is so amazing to see students come together to showcase their work and engage in meaningful dialogue about issues concerning the Native community on campus and beyond. Facilitating interaction between Native American, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian students, at all levels of their Berkeley education, has been an honor and experience I will take with me from my time at Cal!

Olivia Chilcote
Department of Ethnic Studies
Doctoral Student

Jesus Fraire

Jesus Fraire

The most memorable moment for me at Cal was the opportunity to work for the Native American Student Development (NASD) office. It has allowed me to help Native American students by providing them with academic support services. Working at NASD has inspired me to consider a future career in tribal government. My passion for government and helping my community will both be satisfied with a role as an elected official in my Tohono O’odham Reservation.

Jesus Fraire
Major: Political Science
Transfer Student

Jacqueline Rouse

Jacqueline Rouse

The most meaningful aspect of student life for me has been the friendships I have made. These are people that I can really trust and rely on when I need ears to listen or a shoulder to cry on. They are here for me when I am struggling academically, personally or just in general when I encounter something on campus that I just have to vent about. It feels really good to know that people on campus outside of professors, really care about me succeeding.

Jacqueline Rouse
Major: Business
Freshman

Harriet Blair Rowan

Harriet Blair Rowan

It was one of the most rewarding experiences as a reporter: Having a story, thinking it’s important, and then having others think it’s important. I credit my public records class, a required course in the first-year curriculum, for informing my reporting. The class gave me new skills to find more documents. I also commend my instructors, Professors Robert Rogers and David Thigpen, for guiding my reporting. I hope to do international reporting or be a correspondent in Latin America. Political reporting and accountability is what I care about and what I want to pursue. The biggest lesson I learned during my first semester at the journalism school was that you can stand up to big money.

Harriet Blair Rowan
Graduate Student, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, about appearing in a televised interview with Bill Moyers (among other media) based on her series of stories about Chevron.