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If you lived in the residence halls during this academic year, Residential Life will count you in the 2020 Census at your on-campus residence. This means you do not need to fill out the 2020 Census on your own. For other types of group quarters, such as University Village, International House, Co-Ops or CalGreeks, please contact your housing staff to find out how you will be counted. You should still plan on being counted at your campus address.
Students who are living at home should be counted at their home address.
This would be considered a nonfamily household - or people living together who aren’t related. The person who goes online to complete the census should gather all of the information in advance so that he/she can complete the form in one sitting. If you're not sure if one of your roommates included you when they completed the form, you should still fill out the census for yourself and your roommates. The U.S. Census Bureau will do a post-enumeration survey to try to capture undercounting and overcounting.
Participating in the census is required by law. Every person not counted means $10,000 in lost money for Alameda County for education, roads, hospitals, and other important social service programs.
Even if you are planning to return to your permanent residence, you can complete the 2020 Census by phone or online using your UC Berkeley address.
Even if you are planning to return to your permanent residence, you can complete the 2020 Census by phone or online using your UC Berkeley address.
Don’t expect your parents to count you unless you live at home! Even if you are planning to return to your permanent residence, you can complete the 2020 Census by phone or online using your UC Berkeley address.
Yes. Even if you are planning to return to your permanent residence, you can complete the 2020 Census by phone or online using your UC Berkeley address.
Yes! The US Constitution requires that every person living in the US is counted in every Census. You are a member of our community so please get counted - even if you are planning to return to your permanent residence. The Census site does not function outside of the US, so please call 844-330-2020 or have your stateside roommates complete the form for you.
Yes. The census won’t ask about your citizenship status or for a social security number. Under Title 13 of the U.S. Code, the Census Bureau cannot release any identifiable information about individuals, households, or businesses, even to law enforcement agencies. That means your answers are confidential (PDF) and protected by law.
Yes. You should be counted too, even if you are a citizen of another country.
If you will be living outside of the U.S. on April 1, 2020, and are not employed by the government, you will not be counted in the 2020 Census.
You should be counted where you live and sleep most of the time. If you are currently unsheltered or don’t have a physical address, you can still complete the census in person, online or on the phone by providing cross streets or other landmarks. If you live in a shelter or are accessing other community services, you can be counted there.
Yes. You should be counted at the residence where you live and sleep most of the time.
Overcounting does happen. The U.S. Census Bureau will do a post-enumeration survey to try to capture undercounting and overcounting.
You should be counted at the residence where you live and sleep most of the time. If you are currently unsheltered or don’t have a physical address, you can still complete the census in person, online or on the phone by providing cross streets or other landmarks. If you live in a shelter or are accessing other community services, you can be counted there.
People who are moving should be sure to count themselves just once, in one home. Even if you returned to your permanent residence, you can complete the 2020 Census by phone or online using your UC Berkeley address.
The U.S. Census Bureau will not ask you for money, your bank account information or your social security number. To verify if the Census Taker is legitimate, call 213-314-6500. Here are a few more tips from the census on how to avoid a potential scam.
The 2020 Census will be counting everyone living in the country, including same-sex couple households. More information on how your census information supports the LGTBQA+ community can be found on this LGBTQ+ community fact sheet (PDF).
Yes. A question on sex has been included since the first census in 1790. All 2020 Census questions that involve personal characteristics are based on self-identification. When you complete your census, select the box for the sex you identify with.
The 2020 Census won’t ask about sexual orientation and gender identity, but it will ask about your sex-- male or female. Please note that your answers from this survey will serve as a baseline of population counts for many other surveys, including those that measure sexual orientation and gender identity.
No. Your answers are confidential (PDF) and protected by law. Under Title 13 of the U.S. Code, the Census Bureau cannot release any identifiable information about individuals, households, or businesses, even to law enforcement agencies.
If your parents have already listed you on their census questionnaire, don't worry. The U.S. Census Bureau will do a post-enumeration survey to try to capture undercounting and overcounting.
Not to worry! You can still fill out the Census, just make sure to click the button that says “If you do not have a Census ID, Click here” on the home screen.
Not to worry, just head back to my2020census.gov and make sure to fill out the Census for the correct address. It only takes ten minutes! You should also check with your roommates to make sure you all got counted at the same address!